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Tissues

Images

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Eyes of a zebrafish embryo. Credit: Kara Cerveny, Steve Wilson (Wellcom Images)
Eyes of a zebrafish embryo. Credit: Kara Cerveny, Steve Wilson (Wellcom Images)
Neurons in brain tissue. Credit: Maragaret I. Davis (The Cell Image Library)
Neurons in brain tissue. Credit: Maragaret I. Davis (The Cell Image Library)
Neurons in brain tissue showing cell dendrites. Credit: Yinghua Ma, Timothy Vartanian (The Cell Image Library)
Neurons in brain tissue showing cell dendrites. Credit: Yinghua Ma, Timothy Vartanian (The Cell Image Library)
Cross-section of spinal nerve. Credit: Simon Beggs (Wellcome Images)
Cross-section of spinal nerve. Credit: Simon Beggs (Wellcome Images)
Interneurons. Credit: Margaret I. Davis (The Cell Image Library)
Interneurons. Credit: Margaret I. Davis (The Cell Image Library)
Fruit fly eye.  Credit: Karin Panser (1st Prize Huygens Image Contest 2013, copyright IMPy)
Fruit fly eye. Credit: Karin Panser (1st Prize Huygens Image Contest 2013, copyright IMPy)
Inner ear. Credit: David Furness (Wellcom Images)
Inner ear. Credit: David Furness (Wellcom Images)

Movies

THINKING ZEBRAFISH BRAIN. The bright signals show brain activity in a tiny Zebrafish. This movie was made with a special microscope build and operated by Phillip Keller and people in his lab.
BLOOD VESSELS AND BEATING HEART OF CHICKEN EMBRYO. Ink injection into yolk sac artery of 72 hour-old chick embryo to visualize the beating heart and the vasculature (10x). 1st winner prize of 2011 Nikon Small world in motion competition
BEATING ZEBRAFISH HEART. The red color corresponds to blood vessels, the heart cells are labeled in green. Credit Misha B. Ahrens and Philipp J. Keller, Howard Hughes Medical Institute for Zeiss Lightsheet.
MOUSE LIVE KIDNEY DEVELOPING. Mouse kidney that has been cultured in vitro and imaged over 4 days. The fluorescence originates from a conditional yellow fluoresecent protein (YFP) reporter, which is only activated in certain cells. The fluorescent cells belong to the ureteric bud (the tree), the induced nephron progenitors cell (cells around the tree tips) and nephrons that are forming (the shapes forming within the tree). The YFP signal is viewed using a heat-map that has been overlaid onto the bright-field channel. Image taken by Dr. Nils Lindström. 3rd prize of 2011 Nikon Small world in motion competition
(MITOSIS) SEGREGATION OF DNA IN A FLY EMBRYO . The mitotic spindle is shown in green and DNA is shown in red. These colors are generated from fluorescent proteins that are fused to specific proteins (tubulin for the mitotic spindle and histone for DNA). After the spindle forms, the chromosomes (DNA) aligns in the middle and then the sister chromatids separate. In the early fly (Drosophila) embryo, these division cycles occur in a synchronous manner every ~15 min (time is sped up in this time-lapse movie). Credit: David Sharp and Greg Rogers (Albert Einstein University)
WHITE BLOOD CELL MOVEMENT TOWARDS A WOUND. A wounded tissue secretes substances that attract white blood cells from the circulation, which helps to facilitate tissue repair. In this time-lapse movie of a fish tail, the very rapid flow of circulating blood can be seen. Individual white blood cells (leukocytes) also can be observed escaping from the vein and crawling towards the wound. This process is called "chemotaxis", which is a polarized movement towards a chemical attractant. Credit: Mike Redd (U. Utah)
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